Queen Elizabeth II was honored at the UN meeting: ‘Special King’ – National RS News

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This year’s UN General Assembly meeting of world leaders came after another world-famous event – the death of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, which was followed by both an outpouring of contempt and sometimes painful reflections on the colonial empire that ended during her time. seventy years on the throne.

There were also questions about how the loss of a long-reigning monarch might affect the Commonwealth, a voluntary organization of 56 nations that, in many cases, have historical and linguistic ties to Britain. Fourteen of them are Commonwealth “domains” – former colonies where the British monarch, now King Charles III, remains head of state.

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Others were already watching that relationship before the queen’s death.

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Barbados severed its connection with the monarchy and became fully independent last year, at the behest of Elizabeth and Charles. The prime ministers of Jamaica and Antigua and Barbuda said earlier this year they intended to do the same, and Gaston Browne of Antigua and Barbuda followed suit after the queen’s death by telling Britain’s ITV News that he planned to call a referendum within three years.

Others have no such plans, at least not yet. Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese laid the foundation for the Republic of Australia possibly at the beginning of the year but said that after the death of Elizabeth it was time to respect the queen, not to change the government. The Prime Minister of New Zealand, Jacinta Ardern, who supports being a republic, said that she does not plan to take up this issue soon, and said that there are many other problems in the country.

So it’s on the agenda of the General Assembly, too, and the future of the Commonwealth hasn’t played a part in the big talk that individual countries will do. But others take time to remember the queen and call on her words and example to suggest future action — or lessons for leaders.


Click to play video: 'Most Commonwealth countries to cut ties after Queen's death'







Many Commonwealth countries may cut ties after the Queen’s death


Many Commonwealth countries may cut ties after the Queen’s death

Looking at some of the talks:

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British Prime Minister Liz Truss, whom Elizabeth formally appointed two days before her death, said Elizabeth “represents post-war values” under the UN and recalled the Queen’s speech to the General Assembly in 1957.

“He warned that it is important not only to have strong views but also to have the political passion to implement them. Now we must show that will. We must fight to protect those ideas. And we have to free ourselves from all our people,” said Truss.

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Mauritius is a former British colony off the southeast coast of Africa, and the two countries are still at loggerheads over the Chagos Islands, which the UK continues to control. Former residents fought for the right to return to the islands after the 1960s and 1970s when Britain opened a military base.

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The prime minister of Mauritius, Pravind Jugnauth, called on the new Truss government to resolve the issue by putting itself on the “right side of history”, pointing to Elizabeth’s “principles and principles”.

“What honor is more appropriate in remembering this great king who dedicated his life to serving, respecting the values ​​of democracy, human rights and international law, sovereignty and territorial integrity than ending this history and doing so in the right way. respecting sovereignty, security issues, the environment and basic human rights?” he asked.


Click to play video: 'Indigenous people protest over death of Queen Elizabeth II'







Indigenous people are thinking about the death of Queen Elizabeth II


Indigenous people are thinking about the death of Queen Elizabeth II

Papua New Guinea is one of the remote “places” where the UK monarch is still the head of state, and Prime Minister James Marape closed his remarks at the General Assembly by honoring the monarch whom the islanders call “Mama Kwin.”

“Our beloved queen personified kindness, dignity, honesty, humility, tolerance of others, forgiveness and all other Christian qualities and she lived 70 years of constant, unceasing life of public service – some lessons that we world leaders must learn to do,” it said.

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The prime minister of another “kingdom,” Manasseh Sogavare of the Solomon Islands, called him “an inspiration, an example of stability, dignity, and grace.”

Fijian Prime Minister Voreqe “Frank” Bainimarama recalled Elizabeth dropping by to greet other guests to welcome her to a banquet a few years ago – and welcome her country back to the Commonwealth. Fiji was suspended in 2006 after Bainimarama took power in a coup, and was reinstated after elections in 2014, when he won his first term as prime minister.

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The queen’s welcome was “a simple gesture but a special confirmation of all that we have worked to achieve a new and true Fijian democracy,” said Bainimarama, whose head of state is president, not king.

The colonial history of Gabon and Togo lies with France, not Britain, and the two African countries are members of the group of French-speaking countries itself, L’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie. But Togo also joined the Commonwealth last June.

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In the first General Assembly since then, Gabon’s President Ali Bongo Ondimba praised Elizabeth’s “respect, friendship, and wise counsel to many independent countries around the world, small or large” – and added kind words to the new king. Bongo applauded Charles’ concern for the environment, climate change and biodiversity.


Click to play video: 'Recap: Queen Elizabeth II State Funeral'







Recap: Queen Elizabeth II State Funeral


Recap: Queen Elizabeth II State Funeral

Other members of the Commonwealth, from Dominica to Malawi, took the time to express their condolences and pay their respects to the queen. So are several countries that are not part of the group, including the Central African Republic, Madagascar and the Dominican Republic.

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Perhaps the most fulsome praise came from Hungarian President Katalin Novak, who repeatedly quoted the 2010 speech in which Elizabeth told the General Assembly about leadership, the work of the UN and what she sees as the challenge facing the world organization: to continue to show “clearness”. and calling for leadership” without losing sight of their mission to promote security, prosperity and dignity for people around the world.

Novak urged us to come together to “regain our ability to distinguish between what is important and what is not, what is important and what is not, reality and fiction.

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“We said goodbye to a unique king whose life was focused on serving peace,” he said. “We owe it to the people and to his memory to make our decisions in the same spirit.”

© 2022 The Canadian Press

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