Hurricane Fiona is likely to hit Atlantic Canada as a post-tropical storm RS News

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Hurricane Fiona has the potential to become a powerful storm in parts of Atlantic Canada this weekend.

The storm will track north and across the Maritimes late Friday and Saturday as it transitions to a post-tropical storm.

That post-tropical change does not mean that the storm will weaken, but its structure will change. It will grow in proportions and cover even more of the field.

While the “cone of uncertainty” is still very large, it is shrinking day by day. Forecasting models continue to project landfall in Cape Breton or eastern Nova Scotia.

While some uncertainty remains over the route and other details, the potential impacts are becoming clearer.

The rain will arrive well before Fiona. A cold front moving in from the west will bring its rain Thursday into Friday and then begin to bring moisture to Fiona.

Cyclone Fiona will track north and into the Maritimes late Friday and Saturday as it transitions to a post-tropical storm. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

The heaviest rain is expected as Fiona tracks Friday night into Saturday.

Long periods of heavy rain will bring the potential for flooding, especially along and to the left of the road. Rainfall amounts in those areas can reach 100-150 millimeters, or more.

As the storm grows in scale, very strong winds are expected over a large area. With trees in full leaf, the power output will be higher.

The latest forecast models project Hurricane Fiona hitting Cape Breton or eastern Nova Scotia. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

The heaviest rain is expected as Fiona tracks Friday night into Saturday, and will bring the possibility of flooding in some areas. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

Sustained gusts over 100 km/h are possible across central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, PEI and western and southwestern Newfoundland. In these areas, winds can exceed 130 km/h, especially in open coastal areas.

Even in areas farther west, gusts in excess of 70 km/h appear possible.

Widespread gusts in excess of 100 km/h are possible across central and eastern Nova Scotia, Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island. (Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

A storm is likely. The impact will largely depend on the track and timing of the storm and how it interacts with high tides. Stay tuned for more details.

It’s time to prepare. Make sure your emergency kit is ready to go and your propane tank is topped up. Check that your downspout and rainwater are clear and make sure your sump pump and generator are working properly.

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